What Is Thermogenesis?

Thermogenesis is the process in which the body raises its temperature, or energy output. By increasing the thermogenesis within the body, the metabolism is raised and fat cells are then utilized as energy to support this metabolic increase. The thermogenesis process within the body can be triggered by nutrition, supplements and exercise. Prior to taking any supplements or beginning an exercise program, speak with your physician to ensure their safety.

How Does Thermogenesis Work?

Thermogenesis is directly related to the metabolic rate. When the core temperature of the body is increased, the metabolism is stimulated, which ultimately causes the body to use stored fat cells to support the additional energy output. The thermogenesis process can be triggered by taking certain supplements or eating certain foods.

Thermogenesis is the term used by scientists to describe the activity of BAT, which includes dozens of biochemical and metabolic events. The basic outcome of these events is the generation of thermo units, in other words, the creation of heat in your body. But there is a hitch, as you will see in a moment.

Thermogenesis has been observed in living organisms in the following natural situations:

1. In Hibernating Animals- Ever wonder why hibernating animals don’t freeze to death? The answer is thermogenesis. Their bodies spend all winter burning up stored white fat. The burning is done in BAT and it generates enough heat to keep the animal warm.

2. In Cold Adaptation- Ever seen someone working outside in freezing weather with nothing on his/her upper body but a T-shirt? They can do this because they have “adapted” to the cold. And how did this adaptation take place? The same way it did with the hibernating animal. The cold-activated thermogenesis in the BAT.

3. In Eating- Thermogenesis occurs following meals. Unfortunately, most of the calories are supplied directly by the food, not by the white fat.

4. In Small Children- It seems that small children have considerable BAT. However, as they get older, the amount of BAT gradually decreases until, as adults, they have very little. One of the problems facing scientists was to explain this process.

The hitch, then, is simply this: Under normal every-day circumstances, people have little capacity for thermogenesis. Living in warm climates, heated homes and cars, and modern eating behaviors and stresses have all seriously suppressed thermogenic capacity. However, scientists have discovered how to reverse the process that strips us of our thermogenic capacity as we leave childhood, or to give us the thermogenesis that we might never have possessed (due to hereditary factors).